Denver, Colorado alpaca adventures today

High quality alpaca experiences and holiday recommendations in Colorado: Nowhere else but here will you have the same opportunity to experience Alpacas in the open beauty of nature. Get nose-to-nose with Pablo Picasso just one of our resident furry friends. Come explore the scenic mountain views where you can hand-feed a healthy snack to our friendly Alpacas. Live entertainment is part of the fun. Learn fascinating facts about these majestic creatures, and go behind the scenes into a fiber producing Alpaca farm. Chances are, you’ll make a new friend on your visit. For all ages, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity. See additional details at alpaca adventures in Colorado.

For many years, zoologists assumed alpacas and llamas had descended from guanacos, and they were classified in the genus Lama. However, in a 2001 paper titled “Genetic analysis reveals the wild ancestors of the llama and the alpaca” in the journal Proceeding of the Royal Society B, researchers showed there is “high genetic similarity” between the alpaca and the vicuña, and between the llama and the guanaco. They recommended that the alpaca be reclassified as Vicugna pacos.

Additionally, if you have any accessibility concerns that make hiking impossible, then there are also places to sit down next to the alpacas, which makes this activity available to everyone regardless of their ability or needs. The Smooth Alpaca Experience just so happens to have scenic mountain views of Red Rock Park. Yes, that’s right, the iconic Red Rocks Park and Amphitheatre where hundreds of concerts are held each year. Combine a visit to the venue with an alpaca experience. Are you looking for an educational opportunity for your kids? Come enjoy an alpaca experience that’s not only fun but also informative. This alpaca experience takes place on a fiber farm. This type of farm raises animals like alpacas, sheep, goats, llamas, angora rabbits, and more for their fleece and wool.

Do alpacas make noise? Alpacas are very quiet, docile animals that make a minimal amount of sound. They do make a humming sound as a means of communication or to express concern or stress. Most communication between alpacas is nonverbal. Occasionally you will hear a shrill “alarm call,” which usually means they have spotted something of concern nearby, and they are warning others in the herd. The concern may be a predator, or may be something they are not familiar with, like a cow or horse in a neighboring field. Male alpacas also “serenade” females during breeding with a guttural, throaty sound called “orgling.” Read more information on https://meetalpacas.com/.

Are alpacas dangerous? No. Alpacas are pleasant to be around and generally easy to handle. Alpacas do not head-butt. They do not have horns or hooves like other livestock. They move gracefully and adroitly about the field and are therefore unlikely to run into or over anyone intentionally. Males develop sharp fighting teeth at about three years of age which can cause injury to both humans as well as other alpacas. Alpacas will reflexively kick with a hind leg, particularly if surprised from behind. While the impact of an alpaca kick is not on par with a horse, it can create a bruise. Also, there is potential for toenails to cut skin.

So what do you DO with these animals? Alpacas are raised for their soft and luxurious fleece (fiber). Each shearing produces roughly five to ten pounds of fleece per animal, per year. This fleece, often compared to cashmere, can be turned into a wide array of products from yarn and apparel to tapestries and blankets. The fleece itself is recognized globally for its fineness, softness, light weight, durability, excellent thermal qualities, and luster.

Adorable, docile and soft, alpacas are prized as pets and cattle around the world. There are no wild alpacas. Alpacas are domesticated versions of vicuñas, South American ruminants that live high in the Andes. Alpacas are related to llamas, which are domesticated versions of another wild Andean ruminant, the guanaco. While llamas are used as pack animals, alpacas are raised mainly for their soft wool. Guanacos and vicuñas are found throughout the Andes Mountains. They are descended from camelids that developed in North America and migrated to South America 3 million years ago, according to Phil Switzer, an alpaca breeder based in Colorado. These animals evolved into guanacos and vicuñas, and about 6,000 years ago, people in the Andes began to domesticate them. There are two breeds of alpaca, the Huacaya and the Suri. Huacaya alpacas are more common, according to Switzer.