Best blockchain technology news and tips and tricks with Gary Baiton

Premium blockchain solutions and guides by Gary Baiton? Who Can Launch an ICO? Anyone can launch an ICO. With very little regulation of ICOs in the U.S. currently, anyone who can access the proper tech is free to launch a new cryptocurrency. But this lack of regulation also means that someone might do whatever it takes to make you believe they have a legitimate ICO and abscond with the money. Of all the possible funding avenues, an ICO is probably one of the easiest to set up as a scam. If you’re set on buying into a new ICO you’ve heard about, make sure to do your homework. The first step is ensuring the people putting up the ICO are real and accountable. Next, investigate the project leads’ history with crypto and blockchain. If it seems the project doesn’t involve anyone with relevant, easily verified experience, that’s a red flag. Discover more details on https://peatix.com/user/13460543.

In another example, during a one-month ICO ending in March 2018, Dragon Coin raised about $320 million.13 Also in 2018, the company behind the EOS platform shattered Dragon Coin’s record by raising a whopping $4 billion during a yearlong ICO. The first instance of the SEC cracking down on an ICO occurred on Dec. 11, 2017, when the agency halted an ICO by Munchee, a California company with a food review app. Munchee was attempting to raise money to create a cryptocurrency that would work within the app to order food. The SEC issued a cease-and-desist letter, treating the ICO as an unregistered securities offering.

Financial regulators from Australia, the U.K and a long list of other countries also issued warnings to retail investors about the potential hazards of participating in these potentially fraudulent offerings. South Korea and China decidedly imposed complete bans on ICOs around the same time, while Thailand issued a temporary ban on token offerings a year later as regulators drafted up a new legal framework. Despite the widespread regulatory concern regarding ICOs, there is yet no global consensus on passing blanket laws – or amending existing ones – to protect investors from flimsy or fraudulent token sales.

One could make the argument that trading and investing are the same thing. But they’re often differentiated, to a degree, by time horizons—traders are looking to make a relatively quick profit, while investors may only make a handful of changes to their portfolios per year. Nonetheless, day trading can be another way to make money with blockchain currency, just like it is with stocks or other securities. Day traders buy and sell assets within the same day, in order to try and score a quick profit. This is a risky strategy since it’s hard to know how blockchain currency values could change in any given day or overtime. You can start day trading on any exchange today; all you need to do is to sign up, buy some assets, analyze, and you’re all set. You can also start trading through an automatic trading platform like bitcoin profit which allows users to decipher the signals emitted by the trends on bitcoin and other blockchain currencies and start to perform successful small trader.

What Is an Initial Coin Offering (ICO)? An initial coin offering (ICO) is the cryptocurrency industry’s equivalent of an initial public offering (IPO). A company seeking to raise money to create a new coin, app, or service can launch an ICO as a way to raise funds. Interested investors can buy into an initial coin offering to receive a new cryptocurrency token issued by the company. This token may have some utility related to the product or service the company is offering or represent a stake in the company or project. Read extra information on Gary Baiton.

It all started in 2013 when software engineer J.R. Willet wrote a white paper titled “The Second Bitcoin White Paper” for the token MasterCoin (which was rebranded as Omni Layer) and was able to raise US$600,000. By 2014, seven projects had raised a total of $30 million. The largest that year was Ethereum: 50 million ether were created and sold to the public, raising more than $18 million. 2015 was a quieter year. Seven sales raised a total of $9 million, with the largest – Augur – collecting just over $5 million.